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Change is coming: are you prepared? This April, the new financial year brings significant changes to the employer landscape – namely, IR35 and the EU settlement scheme. Read on for the key facts and dates you need to know to ensure your business is ready.

IR35

IR35 applies to people who work for a business in a self-employed capacity but are essentially employees. Clamping down on this practice, changes to UK law will see HMRC recover unpaid tax and National Insurance from businesses if they believe employers are guilty of using self-employment loopholes to avoid giving employees necessary rights and benefits.

From 1 April 2021, companies that employ more than 50 employees or have a turnover of over £10.2 million will need to pay tax or National Insurance for workers or contractors who are essentially employees.

What’s the difference between an employee and a contractor?

Employees have a contract, paid holidays, PAYE, pensions, and a host of employment rights. Meanwhile, self-employed freelancers, workers, and contractors submit invoices, aren’t entitled to holiday or sick pay, and don’t share the same rights as employees.

EU settled status

Another critical change coming to the world of employment is the EU settled status. This applies to businesses with EU citizens working for them, as the individuals will have to reapply for residency status.

Post-Brexit, EU workers can only remain in the UK if they arrived before 31 December 2020 and have applied for residency via the EU Settlement Scheme.

Once individuals have settled status, they’re free to remain in the UK indefinitely and may be eligible to apply for citizenship.

Pre-settled status is available to those who have been in the UK for less than five years. It permits them to stay for five years, after which they can choose to apply for full settled status if they wish to remain here.

The good news is, there’s still time to apply for EU settled status if you or your employees haven’t done it yet.

The deadline for employees to apply for EU settled status is 30 June 2021. It’s free, and you can do it here: https://www.gov.uk/settled-status-eu-citizens-families/applying-for-settled-status

If you’re unsure whether your employees have a legal right to work in the UK post-Brexit, you can check here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/right-to-work-checklist

Can I still employ someone from outside the UK post-Brexit?

Free movement between the UK and the EU ended on 31 December 2020, and a new points-based immigration system is in place in the UK.

So, while you can still employ people from the EU to work in your business following Brexit, they must score the necessary points and have a relevant work permit or status, and you must have a sponsor licence from the Home Office.

Skilled workers who have a job offer from an approved employer sponsor must have a skill level equivalent of RQF3 (equivalent to A level), speak English, score 70 points on the system, and earn at least £25,600 (or the “going rate” for the job).

Employees earning lower salaries may still apply by “trading” points, or if their job is on the shortage occupation list.

You may also transfer an employee from another part of your international business to work in the UK via an “intra-company transfer”, but certain stipulations apply.

Need help preparing for IR35 or post-Brexit employment?

Hopefully, this summary will help you work through the changes coming up in 2021.

If you still need any advice or support, we’re here to help. Call us on 0330 555 1139 or drop us a line at hello@crossehr.co.uk

You can also take a look at our webinar below, delivered for RIBA West London to share some insight on HR matters currently affecting their members.  After many interminable months of furlough doom and gloom, it was great to talk about how businesses can prepare for the future: 

  • Brexit and work permits 
  • IR35 and the impact on contracts 
  • Restructuring
  • And more 

 Check out the recording below and ensure you plan for the upcoming change.