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Focusing on Finances for a Post-Lockdown World

Focusing on Finances for a Post-Lockdown World

Remember your swimming badges at school… My least favourite was the one where – after you had already swum multiple lengths and dived in for a brick – you still had to swim a length in your pyjamas. I remember feeling tired, my swimming stroke wasn’t particularly strong and the weight of my wet PJs made the last bit pretty tough.

I think a lot of us feel like that now, having got through the last few months and fortunate to still have a business, we now must turn our attention to making it post-lockdown. We all feel a bit beaten up by it all. That’s why I’ve decided to share a few tips to get you energized and ready to tackle the post lockdown period.

 

Growth

We are all in a growth phase now as we rebound from this period, but this is different from when you started your business and grew from nothing. Now you can use everything you have learnt from the first time you did it and grow faster and more profitably.

My two key questions to consider;-

Who you want to sell to?

Is it the same people you sold to before or do you now better understand the profile of customer you want to work with? Think about the size of customer, the sector they are in, the location or even the number of decision makers you have to deal with.

What do you want to sell?

Do you know which of your products or services are the most profitable? Can you drop services you didn’t enjoy delivering, have you pivoted during lockdown and have great new offerings to get out there?

 

Capacity

Do you know the maximum capacity you could deliver right now based on your existing cost base?

It’s important to understand this and compare it to what you are delivering and think you may be able to in the coming months.

If you realise you are currently over- capacity, then consider:

-Use of the flexible nature of the Job retention Scheme from 1 July. Understanding what staff you need now is key and knowing your trigger points in terms of sales vs capacity, so you bring people back at the right time.

-Unfortunately, you may need to make redundancies now to preserve the long-term future of your business. If based on realistic sales this is necessary, then do not take too long making this decision.

If you are under capacity because business is going better than anticipated, then think about whether you really need to employ or are you better surrounding yourself with a network of good quality freelancers. The second option puts less pressure on fixed cots during what may be a volatile time.

 

Forecast

In such an uncertain time there is no getting away from the fact you need to forecast your cash flow.

Factors to consider:

Income – So hard to really know what will happen- will recovery be U or V shaped- who knows. Start with your best guess based on what you know now.

Costs – Ensure you build back in any costs which have been reduced during this period e.g. rent reductions, other premises related costs. You may also want to build in costs to help you re-build such as advertising or marketing.

Loan repayments– any loan repayment holidays may be about to expire so ensure you have considered these.

Tax deferrals – If you deferred Vat as part of the Vat deferral scheme ensure you rebuild in repaying this before 31 March 2021.

Sensitivity – Now you have done all this look at how sensitive you are to change – if sales were 10 or 20% lower than you have forecast what impact will that have on your cashflow

Financing – Now you know your position consider if you have the right financing in place.

So deep breath folks, we made it this far. You built your business before and all of this will help you to build faster and more profitably second time round.

 

More Support

Helen Fleet of HF Financial Strategy works as a finance director and guides companies to delivering their financial and business objectives which can include cashflow planning, pricing reviews and ways to improve profitability.

Helen kindly crafted this blog as part of our Return to Work Toolkit. You can download it for free here.

 

The Good Work Plan

The Good Work Plan

April marks that time of year when you can expect a whole new raft of employment changes. And 2020 is no exception with the government’s Good Work Plan. This article explains what the Good Work Plan is, why it’s happening now, the employment law changes it’s introducing and what you need to know and do as an employer.

 

What Is the Good Work Plan?

 

Remember the Taylor review? That was the 2018 government-issued independent review of modern working practices carried out by Matthew Taylor. The Good Work Plan report has been written in response building on some of the recommendations made to tackle new and emerging issues in the modern workplace. And it’s also the vehicle intended to capture the prime minister’s commitment not to maintain and enhance workers’ rights following the UK’s departure from the EU.

The Good Work Plan sets out how the government intends to do this with a clear vision for the future of the UK labour market as one that: “rewards people for hard work, that celebrates good employers and that is ambitious about boosting productivity and earnings potential in the UK.”

 

What Does the Good Work Plan Aim to Deliver?

 

The plan commits to a range of policy and legislative changes to ensure the following key deliverables:

  1. workers can access fair and decent work
  2. both employers and workers are clear about their employment relationships
  3. companies and individuals continue to benefit from the rise in more flexible and varied ways of working without the erosion of key worker protections
  4. the enforcement system is fair and fit for purpose

Based on the idea that all workers deserve quality work, the Good Work Plan aims to build on five foundational qualities that constitute good work. These are: satisfaction, fair pay, participation and progression, well-being, safety and security and voice and autonomy. You’ll find these themes reflected in the changes that come into effect in April 2020.

 

The Changes You’ll Need to Make

 

There’s quite a lot to do before 6th April 2020. From adapting when you issue contracts to how employees request more stable working hours and a whole lot more. It’s all outlined below.

 

Issuing Contracts of Employment

 

From the 6th April 2020 you’ll have to issue a contract of employment on the employee’s first day of work at the latest. Both employees and workers will also need to be provided with a written statement outlining their terms of engagement.

 

Working Hour Requests

 

The government recognises that flexibility works for many businesses and their employees and does not want to stifle this. However, some employers have used the rise of flexible working arrangements to offload business risk onto their employees through zero hours’ contracts. And other organisations have expected significant flexibility from workers while offering little in return.

To counteract these issues it will be a legal requirement for businesses to empower all workers to be able to request a more predictable and stable working contract after 26 weeks of service. This could mean requesting greater certainty around the days the individual works or the number of hours. Employers have three months to respond to any request.

 

Continuous Service Shortens

 

In the current system, employment rights are accrued over time. People who work intermittently for the same employer can find it difficult to gain or access some of these rights due to difficulty building up continuous service.

A one-week break in service allows employers to start an employee’s continuous service record from zero so employees end up back at square one without any employment rights, even if they’ve worked for the same employer on and off for years.

You’ll only be able to declare a break in service after an employee has not worked for you for four weeks or more. This is intended to make it easier for employees to accrue rights.

 

Holiday Pay Calculations Are Changing – Again

 

All employees are entitled to paid time off as a basic protection. However, some individuals and employers are unaware of holiday pay entitlements, highlighting a need for more and better information. There’s also evidence that some individuals have been prevented from taking their leave and that seasonal workers have been impacted by the 12 week reference period used to calculate holiday pay.

To counteract these issues the government is providing:

  • an awareness campaign for workers and employers
  • new guidance to help businesses comply with the law
  • an updated and improved holiday pay calculator

When calculating holiday pay, you’ll need to expand the timeframe used from 12 to 52 weeks.

 

Hospitality Staff Must be Allowed to Keep Their Tips

 

Although most businesses act in good faith and pass tips on to workers a small number of employers do not. Legislation will ban businesses from retaining tips resulting in a fairer deal for workers and a level playing field for employers.

 

Recruitment Agencies Cannot Use Pay Between Assignments

 

Agency workers used to be able to give up their right to equal pay (in comparison to permanent staff doing the same or like work) in return for a contract guaranteeing pay between assignments.

Investigations revealed this was not happening for some agency workers who were on long assignments. This effectively removed their right to equal pay without the benefit of between-contract pay as there was no between-contract period.

You can no longer use this type of contract to guarantee equal wages with comparable permanent workers for all long-term agency workers.

 

More Consultation Rights For Employees

 

Employees are already entitled to be consulted on major workforce reforms like restructuring. However, to set up information and consultation arrangements in a business, 10% of employees must support the idea. This is dropping to just 2% with a minimum threshold of 15 employees in agreement.

 

What Next?

 

To enforce all these legislative changes, the government is bolstering the penalties businesses will receive if they flout the law. Instead of a maximum of £5,000 for an aggravated breach, this figure will rise to a maximum of £20,000. And where employment rights are repeatedly ignored by the same employer, tougher penalties will ensue.

This makes it vitally important that you make the relevant changes to your HR policies, processes and paperwork before 6th April 2020.

Get an experienced helping hand with all this change. Contact Crosse HR on 0330 555 1139 or at hello@crossehr.co.uk to ensure you’re compliant.

 

 

Ageism in the Workplace – Problem or Opportunity?

Ageism in the Workplace – Problem or Opportunity?

With all their experience, you’d think employers would revere older workers. Yet research shows that more than a third of employees believe there is age discrimination in their workplace. And, despite employment law which should protect workers from age discrimination, a significant 19% of employers share the same concerns.

With the ONS predicting a continued increase in the proportion of older workers, are employers missing out on a golden opportunity by ignoring older workers in favour of younger employees? We take a look at this issue, the benefits that a more mature workforce bring and the steps you can take to attract and retain older employees.

 

Why Employers Might Have to Hire More Older Workers

Between 1993 and 2018, the number of workers over the age of 65 doubled. And employment for those aged 50 to 64 increased by a third. There are many factors contributing to this rise in work rates amongst older people including:

  • Longer life expectancy and better health – many people simply feel they are not ready to retire yet.
  • Job enjoyment – plenty of people enjoy their work and want to continue.
  • Social interaction – work fills a large proportion of the day with the social contact that many might not otherwise get.
  • Lack of pension savings – some people need to keep earning a living thanks to pension changes.

According to the ONS, the number of older workers is set to continue because by 2041 the baby boomers who are currently in their 50s will have moved into older age. By 2066, there will be a further 8.6 million UK residents aged 65 years and over, taking the total number in this group to 20.4 million and making up 26% of the total population. 

It’s expected that more of this group will continue to work. Making it more likely that employers will need to hire from this population. 

 

Why Hire Older Employees?

As employees progress through their careers they amass significant skills, experience and knowledge. This creates something akin to skills muscle memory, enabling employees to access and flex their expertise at will. 

Ageist employers who overlook older workers for younger employees risk a potential brain drain as mature employees seek more open-minded businesses who are willing to support them. One such employer, well known for their willingness to employ older people, is B&Q.

 

B&Q – A Case In Point

It’s 20 years since B&Q launched its pioneering age diversity project. The scheme was instigated following feedback from customers who wanted to be served by someone who had lived in their own home and knew something about DIY.

In response, in the late 1980s, B&Q staffed its Macclesfield store solely with over 50s (which of course would be illegal today). Eleven years later, the company worked with Warwick University to benchmark the Macclesfield store against four other B&Q supercentres.

The results were extremely positive and helped validate the business case for an age-diverse workforce:

  • Profits were 18% higher.
  • Staff turnover was six times lower.
  • There was 39% less absenteeism and 58% less shrinkage (reduction in profit due to lack of scheduled staff).
  • There was an improved perception of customer service and an overall increase in the skill base.

Today B&Q continues to employ a workforce that reflects the make-up of the local community, but with an emphasis on employing people over 50. 

To make this approach work for them, B&Q adapted a range of HR poli

cies to ensure older staff were catered for. By offering a range of contract types, flexible working to all employees regardless of age and enabling employees to reduce their hours or take a less physical role, the company has created the conditions for mature workers to thrive.

 

How Can You Attract and Retain Older Employees?

ONS data shows that nearly nine in 10 people are in work at the age of 50, yet this falls to less than one in two for employees in their mid-60s. With so many highly experienced people who are ready and willing to work, there’s a pool of untapped potential available to your business.

Although you can’t positively discriminate in favour of older workers when it comes to recruitment, you can create employment conditions to make you an even more attractive employer. 

A range of HR policies that cater to older people could include: 

  • Solid health and wellbeing support offering peace of mind to older workers who are often concerned about their health. 
  • Income protection and access to occupational health support and employee assistance plans.
  • Financial education around retirement planning to ensure workers understand the options available to them. 
  • Aligned to HR policies designed to help older workers ease into retirement on their terms.
  • Recognise and make the most of the experience of older workers by pairing them up with less experienced employees.

Position your business in a way that’s attractive to older workers and you’ll become the employer of choice for this demographic. Positioning you to choose the cream of the crop for your business.

 

Find out whether your business is primed to attract older workers by booking your free HR review with experienced HR consultant Olga Crosse. Call us today on 0330 555 1139 or email us at hello@crossehr.co.uk.

 

5 Simple Steps to Superb Employee Engagement

5 Simple Steps to Superb Employee Engagement

Reduced staff turnover. Improved productivity. Fewer sick days. These are just some of the advantages employee engagement brings to businesses.  

Improving your people’s engagement levels doesn’t need to become a mammoth task. There are lots of straightforward ways to enhance engagement and gain all those lovely business benefits. Here are our top five simple steps to help you achieve superb employee engagement. 

 

#1 – Listen and Change 

When employees dread coming into work, you can guarantee your engagement levels are on the floor. To prevent colleagues experiencing that heart-sinking feeling, it’s time to find out what’s holding your people back so you can take action.   

I often suggest setting up set up face-to-face discussion groups to explore the challenges impacting employees. Ensure people know that there won’t be any repercussions for expressing their views. After all, the more honest they can be, the better for your organisation. 

Prevent sessions from turning into moan-fests by asking people to suggest the kinds of change they’d like to see. By involving employees in the solution, you’ll get them on side and enthusiastic about change. 

Then create a plan of action, delegate tasks and report back on the impact to employees. By taking their views seriously and demonstrating that change is happening, you’ll turn attitudes around, boost engagement and make your business more productive too. 

 

#2 – Share Good Practice Between Teams 

Recognition comes in many forms and holding up examples of fantastic work methods is one. Identify which individuals, teams or departments are excelling in what they do and ask them to share their practices. 

Not only is this a great way for employees to see their ideas and methods being praised but it will raise the performance of other teams too. This kind of peer-to-peer learning makes a refreshing change from more formal styles of training and it also fosters engagement and creates or strengthens links between your employees. 

 

#3 – Meet Different Demographic Needs 

With five generations in the workplace, employers must grasp the different focuses and tendencies between the generations in order to keep everyone satisfied. By understanding the way that each cohort thinks, you’ll have a good grasp of how to change your organisation to meet employee needs. 

This could mean expanding your employee benefit offering to cater to people in different age brackets. Or placing a greater focus on green and ethical issues or providing flexible working options. 

That said, it’s important not to shoehorn everyone in a demographic bracket into the same pigeonhole. After all, a millennial with a family and one without will have very different priorities. Which leads us on to the next point. 

 

#4 – Treat People Like Individuals 

The days of one-size-fits-all is well and truly over when it comes to people management. Yes, processes and policy still need to be in place to ensure you’re treating people legally, fairly and equitably. But the rise of individualism in society at large has spilled over into the workplace. Which means you need to treat each individual as, well, an individual. 

One way to better understand your employees is to ask each team member to complete a free online personality test. Based on tried and trusted psychological principles, 16 Personalities provides valuable insight into individuals, their preferences and approaches to relationships and work. 

Get each team member to take the test and present the most informative aspects of their personality to the rest of the team. It’s a great way to be more open about what individuals need and will help managers better engage with their staff too. 

 

#5 – Get Social 

Personal relationships are a key ingredient in employee engagement. Like any team, people who understand and care about each will pull together and go the extra mile to support one another. And by doing so they’ll also support your business. 

A simple way to generate closer bonds is to sponsor a range of social events like: 

  •  Giving managers a budget so they can take their team out for lunch or dinner 
  • Hold a party 
  • Get employees involved in fundraising events 
  • Launch volunteering days where your team gets to work together away from the workplace 
  • Celebrate every employees birthday 
  • Hold sporting events or start a lunchtime walking club 

 The options are pretty much endless and you can ask a colleague to take charge so the initiatives are employee-centred rather than a top-down idea. 

Employee engagement doesn’t need to be difficult. By gaining a better understanding of your people, their needs and preferences, you’ll help everyone better connect with their colleagues and their work. As a result, commitment will soar making engagement a win-win for your employees and your business. 

For a helping hand with your employee engagement, talk to Olga at Crosse HR on 0330 555 1139 or at hello@crossehr.co.uk. 

 

Sharing Success Through Incentives

Sharing Success Through Incentives

When you want to encourage staff to raise their game you can turn to carrot or stick. Most businesses take the carrot approach by offering employee incentives to enhance performance. In this article, we explore the range of incentives available, we take a look at employee share ownership schemes and consider what you need to think about when introducing incentive schemes.

There’s Plenty of Choice When It Comes to Employee Incentives

There are three main categories of employee incentives ranging from less to more formal schemes:

Appreciation

Letting your staff know you value them can be achieved in many different ways including staff parties, team building days, family events, birthday celebrations and team lunches to name but a few. These one-off activities can often be provided in response to a specific achievement, like a team delivering a major project milestone successfully. Or they can become part of the way you engage staff and create a pleasant and appreciative working environment. For example, by providing a cheese board or cake to celebrate birthdays. 

Recognition

Thanking employees for their hard work via a monetary reward of a simple vote of thanks is a great way to ensure employees’ ongoing engagement. Recognition often takes the form of a company-wide recognition scheme that rewards a framework of specific activities and/or behaviours designed to support the business’ strategic objectives. 

Recognition can also include programmes like: 

  • long service awards that reward loyalty to the organisation usually for milestones like 5,10, 15 years of service and beyond
  • employee referral schemes that encourage staff to introduce job candidates – this helps the organisation save on recruitment costs, a proportion of which is passed on to the staff member making the referral

Compensation

Pay increases aren’t always about keeping pace with the salaries other companies are paying. Compensation can be used to reward top performers for their contribution as well as ensuring your business retains their services. 

Bonuses are another, less expensive, way to reward individuals as – unlike a pay increase – bonuses do not increase the cost of the individual’s benefits like pension contributions. Bonuses are usually calculated on the basis of the business’ and the individual’s performance as a percentage of employees’ pay. More senior employees with greater impact on the business tend to be entitled to larger bonuses than less senior staff.

Profit sharing is another option that we’ll explore in more detail next.

Employee Incentives Ownership Schemes

As a business owner you have a vested interest in how well your business performs. But if your employees turn up simply to secure their base pay and their job, they have less reason to care about your business’ success. That’s where employee ownership schemes come into play. 

They allow employees to acquire shares in a business giving them an additional financial reason to care about the performance of your business. The better the business does, the more individuals’ shares are worth. Which provides an added employee incentive for staff to enhance their performance and productivity.

Big businesses like Royal Mail, ASDA, Tesco and Morrisons all provide share ownership schemes for their staff. But this doesn’t exclude smaller businesses from offering these kinds of programmes as there are a range of schemes – including tax efficient options – available. 

Employee ownership schemes fall into three categories:

  1. Share option schemes – employees can buy shares at a set price on a specific day. 
  2. Share gifting scheme – your company can choose to give shares to staff for free. The shares are usually held in trust for a period of time.
  3. Share purchase scheme – where staff can buy shares in the company, normally at a discounted rate.

Most schemes require staff to hold onto their shares for a fixed period of time – this makes it more likely that the share price will increase providing larger payouts and it also supports staff retention as any profits are usually forfeit if staff leave before the vesting period.

What Should You Employee Incentives Be?

Employee incentives should reward activities and/or behaviours that support your business’ goals for the short and long term. However, incentive schemes can have unintended consequences, so you need to carefully consider what you want to reward people for. 

Employee ownership programmes need careful communication to ensure staff understand how the scheme works and how they can impact the business’ – and therefore their shares – performance.

Any programme needs to be communicated clearly and should have transparent processes and rules so all staff have the opportunity to engage effectively with the scheme. This will also ensure you get the best return on any payments you make.

Setting up an employee incentive scheme can be tricky so it’s worth working with an experienced HR consultant to ensure you consider every angle including the legal and tax perspectives. 

For support incentivising your employees, get in touch with Olga on 0330 555 1139 or at hello@crossehr.co.uk.

 

Past it at 40

Past it at 40

I was very shocked to read that in today’s modern ‘Politically Correct’ lets not offend anyone, totally inclusive, non judgmental (stay away from Twitter), liberal society, women are considered to have reached the peak of their careers at 40 and men at 45. That’s nice isn’t it? A mere 18 years (for women) and 23 years for men (on average) into our working lives we are considered done, has been’s. For most of us who have at least 20 – 25 years left to work past the age of 40, that’s an awful lot of years left to go on a downward work spiral. 18% of the UK population is aged 65 and over!

To listen to today’s politically correct media you would be forgiven by thinking that only the young in their 20’s and 30’s can invent and be innovative. So consider this, Henry Ford was 40 when he established Ford and 45 when he invented the Model T, Charles Darwin was 50, Samuel L Jackson was 46 when he hit the big time, Penicillin was discovered by a man aged 46 Alexander Fleming who was rewarded for it when he was 56 some 10 years later.

With age comes experience and a level of calmness, you’ve been there, seen that, made the mistakes and found the solution and that is very valuable indeed. More experienced employees are not past it, set in their ways, far from it, today’s 45 – 60 year old’s started work when email wasn’t even around never mind the internet, most of them didn’t have a mobile phone until their late 20’s early 30’s – so imagine the changes they have seen and dealt with that millennial’s couldn’t even conceive.

So before writing anyone over the age of 40 off, imagine how much you can learn and benefit from those years of experience and sheer depth of knowledge.

If you need any politically correct guidance on employing people of an older generation, please contact us.

Flexible Benefits – What They Are and How to Use Them 

Flexible Benefits – What They Are and How to Use Them 

Over the past few decades, lifestyles have become more flexible and people are able to differentiate in their choices about practically everything. This isn’t just a consumer trend: businesses have also become wise to the fact that their employees all have different needs that need to be catered for through flexible benefits.

This has resulted in organisations taking a more individualistic approach to benefit provision.  

In this blog, we explore what flexible benefits are, why they’re a popular choice and how your business can implement and get the most from them. 

What Are Flexible Benefits? 

All organisations provide employee benefits which are usually determined by grade. In most instances, the more senior the role, the more valuable the benefits package. Depending on seniority, core employee benefit packages, where the benefits are paid for by the employer, typically include items like: 

  • company car 
  • holidays 
  • private medical insurance 
  • critical illness cover 
  • long-term health cover 
  • health checks 

In addition, employers also often voluntary benefits like think discounted gym memberships, dental insurance and household or holiday insurance. Employees can choose to take up these products voluntarily, paying for the benefits themselves, usually out of their pay. 

This approach is fine if the core benefits on offer meet every employee’s needs. But what if your employer provides a company car but you don’t drive? Or you’re already covered on your partner’s private medical insurance so you don’t gain any advantage from this benefit? Or you don’t have any dependents but your employer insists on providing life cover any way? 

When benefits aren’t suitable for employees, companies are paying for benefits that aren’t used or they’re providing an unappetising benefit offering to their staff that fails to engage.   

Flexible benefit programmes provide a solution to this problem. Instead of offering standard benefit packages in the usual way, flexible benefit packages enable employees to vary their pay and benefits to meet their personal requirements.  

In most schemes, staff can retain their existing salary while selecting the right mix of benefits for them. Or they can adjust their salary up or down by taking fewer or more benefits.  

Let’s look at some examples to explore how this works: 

  • A single employee rejects the family private medical insurance cover they’re entitled to due to their grade and opts for single cover only – they receive the cost difference in cash 
  • Someone who doesn’t take all their holidays each year chooses to sell five days holiday and uses the saving to take up family private medical cover with the rest taken as cash 
  • An individual who doesn’t drive forgoes the company car benefit and takes the cash instead – they use it to buy more holiday and take up dental insurance and gym membership  

These are just a few examples of the sorts of flexibility flexible benefit schemes can offer. However, not all programmes will be this flexible; some employers decide that their staff must take a certain level of benefits (usually items like life cover or other insurances) as a minimum. And there are other considerations, like minimum pension auto-enrolment contributions, that need to be worked into the scheme. 

How Many Companies Use Flexible Schemes? 

According to Aon, just 12% of employers operate flexible benefit schemes. Which is surprising given research from Willis Towers Watson which shows that: 

  • 66% of employees who are offered choice in their benefits report their benefits meet their needs 
  • 30% of employees who are not offered choice in their benefits report their benefits meet their needs

However, the answer could lie in the perceived challenges associated with setting up and running a flexible benefit scheme.  

What to Consider When Setting Up a Flexible Benefits Programme 

There’s a lot to think about if you want to set up a flexible benefits scheme in your organisation: 

  • Online or paper – this might work for smaller businesses or those where staff don’t have access to computers. Otherwise online options, although more expensive, tend to offer ease of use and greater flexibility. 
  • Choosing benefit options – it’s easiest to transition your existing benefits to a flex scheme before expanding the options available. You’ll need to decide which benefits must be selected or whether you want to allow a more flexible approach. 
  • Keeping schemes up to date – every change in your benefits, tax and legislation must be reflected in your scheme which involves additional work in terms of configuring scheme rules, calculations and systems (if online). 

Although each of these sounds fairly straight forward, flexible benefit schemes can quickly become complex and require technical decision making which requires HR specialist knowledge.  

However, the pay off could well be worth the effort as flexible benefits help organisations stand out in the recruitment marketplace. And they can also be a powerful tool for retention as your benefit package will meet the needs of every segment of your workforce, regardless of life stage.  

There’s a lot to think about if you want to set up a successful flexible benefits scheme, so consider working with a seasoned HR consultant to ensure you deliver legally and secure a great return on your investment. 

For flexible support with all your HR projects, get in touch with Crosse HR on 0330 555 1139 or at hello@crossehr.co.uk. 

 

Menopause – the dirty secret

Menopause – the dirty secret

15.1 million women are at work in the UK. So it’s safe to assume that at some stage in the next 20 or so years those 15.1m women will go through the menopause in the workplace. That’s an awful lot of people who are absolutely guaranteed to go through a fairly seismic shift in their lives.  Learn more about managing the menopause in the workplace and download our free Menopause HR Policy.

Menopause in the Workplace

We hear a lot of talk about millennials and their issues, but consider this, a huge proportion of the workforce at any given time is going through a massive physical and physiological change and no one wants to talk about it much less do anything about it.

99% of businesses in the UK do not even have a menopause in the workplace policy, they have Well-being policies sure but nothing not a jot, iota or mention of what perhaps 10% of their workforce is going through and 50% will face at some stage in their lives.

We all have mothers, sisters, friends, wives, girlfriends, work colleagues, so it’s safe to assume that all of us know someone that is going through this right now – silently, alone and totally ignored.

The average age for women to go through the menopause is 51, (some go through it much earlier, some later), it can last up to 7 years, yes you heard right, 7 long, upsetting, draining, weird years. Symptoms include interrupted sleep, hot flushes, night sweats, night terrors, weight gain, irritability, mood swings, depression, general malaise, brain fog and a lot more I won’t mention – in short, a fairly miserable set of symptoms.

With the skills shortage in the UK we will all have to work a lot longer (up to 70 and beyond) as we have diddly squat in pensions. But yet, not yet halfway through their working lives, a huge proportion of women are going through the hell that is the menopause in the workplace – unsupported.

Do you have a Menopause Policy?

Recently I’ve written a Menopause HR Policy, to help all employers and I mean ALL employers deal with this issue. Include it in your wellbeing policies, have it as a stand-alone, it’s as important as your maternity policy. You can download it below for free. So employers start preparing and start by buying fans!

Download your Free Menopause in the Workplace HR Policy

Menopause

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Also check out www.megsmenopause.comh