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What you need to know about redundancy – an employer’s guide

What you need to know about redundancy – an employer’s guide

Right now, we know you’re facing tough decisions in the workplace, and redundancies are commonplace. Yet, a lack of basic understanding still surrounds redundancy in many businesses.  

Our free restructuring toolkit is full of essential information and resources, including a general guide to redundancy, how the redundancy process works and templates for your business plan, consultations, meeting records, notice periods and at-risk employee communications.  

 In this blog, we’ll give you an insight into what you’ll find in our restructuring toolkit and answer your top 10 most pressing redundancy questions. Read on to gain a clear, practical grasp of redundancy to move forward confidently.  

#1 – I have four people and three jobs. Can I make the last one redundant? 

 No, the last in, first out criteria was abolished years ago, as it paved the way for claims of indirect age and gender discrimination and unfair dismissal. Instead, use selection criteria or a competitive interview process to determine who you will make redundant. 

#2 – Can I make redundant employees work their notice period? 

 Yes, as per the terms of their contract. Although employees can try to negotiate a shorter notice period with you, that’s your decision. If your employees refuse to work out their notice, they’ll be in breach of their contract, and you won’t have to pay them for this period.  

#3 – Do I have to pay redundancy? 

 Yes. If your employees have more than two years’ service, they’re entitled to a statutory redundancy payment paid out by the employer.  

#4 – Do I have to pay a redundancy notice? 

 Yes. Regardless of the length of service, all employees are entitled to a paid notice period during a redundancy.  

#5 – Can I make a pregnant employee redundant? 

 Yes, although not because she is pregnant. If you wish to make a pregnant employee redundant, you must follow the proper process and ensure her job is genuinely redundant. If you fail to do this, your employee can claim unfair dismissal on the grounds of her gender and circumstances. 

#6 – Can I reinstate the job after making someone redundant? 

 No. The point of redundancy is that the job no longer exists, so you don’t require that employee’s services to fulfil it. If you immediately advertise for the same position after making someone redundant, it isn’t a genuine redundancy, and you could face legal action.  

#7 – If business picks up following a redundancy process, can I reinstate the job? 

 You should wait between six to 12 months after a redundancy process before introducing and advertising for a similar role, or it won’t be a genuine redundancy. If trade has improved significantly after this period, you can review your requirements and proceed accordingly.  

#8 – An employee I wanted to retain has volunteered for redundancy. What should I do? 

 Redundancy is an employer’s choice, not the employee’s. So, ultimately, it’s your decision to make. However, if your employee is volunteering for redundancy, they are likely to be unhappy in their job and may look elsewhere. Therefore, talk to the employee to address any concerns or issues they have to see if you can help them feel happier in their role. 

#9 – Can I take redundant employees back if business picks up?  

Yes, you can and should. 

#10 – How do I stop redundant employees suing me?  

You can’t unless you ask them to sign a Settlement Agreement. All employees have a right to take their claim to an employment tribunal if they feel you’ve treated them unlawfully. However, if you’re confident you’ve followed procedure and treated employees fairly, this shouldn’t pose an issue to your business. 

How do I find bespoke redundancy support?  

In this blog, we’ve covered the 10 most common questions you’ve asked us about redundancy.  

However, if we haven’t answered your question here and you need further advice, we can offer you bespoke support designed around your needs and circumstances.   

There’s no need to deal with your HR headache alone – let us ease the pain by providing practical support.   

 Call us on 0330 555 1139 or email hello@crossehr.co.uk, and let’s see how we can help you navigate redundancies with confidence.

 

How to take your business into 2021 with confidence

How to take your business into 2021 with confidence

With the (dare we say it?) unprecedented events of 2020 behind us, it’s time to look ahead to 2021. January is the ideal time to reflect on lessons learned in the previous year and prepare for a successful 12 months.

Now, more than ever, it’s vital to tackle the year head-on armed with as much information and foresight as possible.

Read on to see what we gleaned from the challenges of 2020, and how you can set your business up for a fruitful 2021.

 

How did we support you through 2020?

Hopefully, we were able to support you and your business during the trials of 2020, whether as a client or simply by reading our blogs for HR advice and suggestions on navigating the many issues the year threw at us.

In a rapidly changing landscape of furlough, redundancies and working from home, we sought to be your HR helpline and respond to your shifting needs. As well as providing plenty of free advice, we also created useful resources to address topical challenges happening in your business.

Finding the positives in 2020, we posted a guest blog full of insightful advice on maximising efficiency, income and budget, as well as encouraging you to recognise your strengths and congratulate yourself on surviving what was undoubtedly one of the most challenging years in business.

Appreciating your positive qualities is a fantastic way to grow, both personally and professionally.

 

Restructuring toolkit

In July, we created a free restructuring toolkit to help you work through the changes in your business from an HR perspective. The kit featured advice on redundancy, a business plan template, meeting record templates, at-risk employee communications and a redundancy notice period template.

Aimed at maximising your reduced budget and limited time, the kit is still available for free on our website – download it here.

 

Return to work toolkit

Bringing your employees back to work after lockdowns and furlough periods was another task to overcome in 2020. To ease the transition, we created a free HR return to work guide. This pack included risk assessments, Covid-safe workplace advice, office hours tips, flexible working support and wellbeing guidance.

Now we’re in our third lockdown, this pack will once again prove useful when your team returns to the office. Download yours here.

 

Why is HR important to your business in 2021?

With constant changes occurring in the world of work, HR is the cornerstone of your business and can enable you to support your teams through the pandemic’s everyday challenges.

As HR specialists, we understand your employees’ needs and can help you implement processes and procedures that will support your teams and safeguard your business.

Plus, we stay on top of HR trends, technology and challenges to communicate the critical takeaways to you in a simple, digestible format with clear advice on how you can keep your business protected and productive.

 

Why you need to start planning your year

Forget diets and detoxes: top of your list of new year’s resolutions should be business planning!

Plotting out your objectives and targets for the year may seem tricky at such a confusing time, but it will provide you with a roadmap through which to steer your business through the coming months.

Setting targets helps you prepare for all eventualities, meaning no nasty surprises. Plus, it can encourage positive changes in behaviour which spark higher retention rates, less pressure and increased productivity among your team.

What’s more, planning the year will enable you to react fast to industry or nationwide changes, understand your budget and funding options better and manage staffing levels successfully.

A crucial part of your planning for the year should include your appraisal schedule. As every business tries to perform to its potential during challenging circumstances, appraisals can help you assess what’s working and what’s not. In doing so, you can carve out a clear action plan to ensure your business maximises its resources to hit key targets.

Find out more about appraisals and download your free guide here.

 

HR changes post-Brexit

January 2021 sees a new points-based immigration system implemented in the UK, so employers who wish to recruit or retain non-UK citizens must follow specific processes to stay compliant. Plus, employees themselves may have the reapply for residency status.

If you’re unsure about these issues and how they might affect your team, check out our blog on the subject here.

Keep following our blog and social media channels to stay updated on all the latest post-Brexit HR news as it develops over this year.

 

Preparing for IR35

Originally scheduled to be introduced in April 2020, the IR35 tax legislation will now come into play this April.

For a full explanation of the changes due to be implemented – and how you can prepare for them – check out our blog on IR35 here.

 

Here to support you

As you take your business into 2021, we want to reassure you that we’ll be here with you every step of the way.

HR is a critical element in the smooth running of your business, especially during challenging periods. So, we will be providing advice, support and guidance at every turn.

Whether you’re a client or you use our free HR resources – like the restructuring toolkit, the return to work toolkit or the appraisals toolkit, for example – we will be working hard for you throughout 2021 and beyond.

Remember, we’re always available for a chat, advice or support – please contact us if we can help your business with any kind of HR guidance.

 

 

End of Year Reviews

End of Year Reviews

What a year 2020 has been. It’s put a strain on us all: mentally, physically, personally and professionally. So, as we come to our end of year reviews, how should we approach them?

We take a look at the importance of regular appraisals, emotional intelligence, setting targets for 2021 and how to assess personnel that may have been furloughed or missed a significant chunk of time due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Read on to discover more…

 

End of Year Reviews

End of year reviews are annual meetings held to evaluate performance and identify any causes of concern or improvement. They provide an important opportunity to:

  • Identify areas of weakness and create a plan to address this
  • Refine responsibilities – referencing priorities and workload
  • Identify opportunities for development – with reference to training or next steps
  • Agree measurable targets and next steps

However, as well as being an opportunity for examination and assessment, end of year reviews also act as a great time for employees to celebrate their achievements. By reflecting back on the year, both parties can recognise the progress made by the employee and explore exciting next steps.

Remember, the review process is the ideal opportunity for employees to share how you can help them perform better!

However, it’s fair to say that this year is a bit different. With many employees absent from the business, forced into new homeworking conditions and mass uncertainty about what the future holds, it’s important to adapt accordingly.

In the next section of this blog, we will advise how you can lead a suitable review in the current climate.

 

Acting with Empathy

Research shows that empathy is one of the key drivers of overall performance and that teams with more empathetic bosses produce better results. Therefore, with a difficult year under our belts, we urge you to actively act with empathy.

Whilst we’re not suggesting that you simply let employees off the hook for the year, now more than ever, managers must apply an appropriate dose of context with their judgements, rather than viewing performance as just black or white.

Employees are facing a multitude of toils and trouble – with fears of job loss, stress and concerns for health having a significant effect on the workforce as a whole. Therefore, having the emotional intelligence and sensitivity to navigate a successful appraisal in the current circumstances could prove more difficult than anticipated.

When assessing your employees, consider:

  • How can I reassure and support the employee?
  • Has the pandemic impacted results?
  • Would I expect leniency if I missed my targets?
  • How can I fairly judge performance?

Whilst analysing progress is key to a successful appraisal, ensure that this is well-balanced with time to check in with the employee, their wellbeing and their plans for the future. Remember, it wasn’t the choice of some to work from home and it could have uprooted feelings of great difficulty or isolation.

Discuss how you can better support them – considering how you can help nurture growth and development. Whilst it’s understandable that many employers wont’ be in a financial position to fund training, pay rises or even promise job security, it may be possible for personnel to utilise this quieter period to undertake free training to further their skills.

It may be useful to point your employees in the direction of The Skills Toolkit for free digital courses that can help teach new skills, recap fundamentals or further knowledge.

 

Looking to the Future

One aspect of reviews this year that will prove to be especially difficult is setting attainable targets for 2021. Whilst the economy is unstable and uncertain, it’s very difficult to predict how businesses will fare. Therefore, this needs to be reflected in targets and the usual increase in performance or productivity may need be reviewed.

It’s important to:

  • Set SMART objectives
  • Be realistic – recognise that targets may need to digress from previous years
  • Focus on what is attainable in the current circumstances
  • Set targets that asses the quality of work produced, not just quantity
  • Consider reviewing targets quarterly

Finally, when making plans for the future and discussing next steps, consider how this will look in the coming weeks and months. Will home working be permanent? How will this affect how employees are measured? Do you need to increase the frequency of reviews or touch-base more? These are all questions that must be answered when putting plans in place for 2021.

 

How to Assess Furloughed Staff:

This year is like no other. Shocks to the economy have meant that much of the workforce have experienced reduced hours, furlough or been absent from the business for weeks or months at a time. So, how should you assess your furloughed staff?

An Employer’s Standpoint:

As an employer, there is no issue in carrying out appraisals whilst your employees are furloughed, since taking part in the appraisal would not count as work.

However, the person who is leading the appraisal (ie, the manager), could not be furloughed whilst appraisals are being conducted. This is because the appraisals are counted as work for the manager or company representative leading the meeting.

Considerations:

Just because an employee hasn’t been present for the whole year, it doesn’t mean that you should skip your end of year appraisal.

This meeting is greatly beneficial for both the employer and employee to check in, refocus and identify how to progress. Failure to do so may result in:

  • Employee confusion, upset and anxiety
  • Uncertainty for the future
  • Outdated or inappropriate goals or targets

How do you measure new starters? Or those that have returned from maternity leave? Measuring employees on a part-time basis isn’t a new concept. As with most plans this year, it just needs a little adapting.

 

More Support – For Them and For You:

Feedback shouldn’t just be provided once a year in an annual review. In fact, most employees respond best to continual feedback from their managers. To discover more about continual feedback, read our blog here. It’s a great way to provide more support for your employees, especially as many businesses continue with remote working.

For more support and information on how to conduct your staff appraisals, contact us today! We’re experts in supporting you with even the most complicated people-management headaches, so that you can rest easy knowing that you’re doing best by your business and employees.

 

Occupation: Full Time Parent

Occupation: Full Time Parent

Coronavirus has highlighted an issue that’s been present for years: employees are concerned about being negatively judged for needing working adjustments to accommodate their children. But what will the knock-on effects be and why do we need to act now to support working parents?

We take a look at the ongoing issues that working parents face, outline your legal standpoint and discuss what ‘reasonable’ adjustments can be made as society faces a modern-day childcare crisis.

 

UK Childcare Crisis

Childcare has been a hot topic since schools shut in March – exposing a lack of support for over 13 million working parents in the UK. That’s about 40% of the working population.

However, this is an ongoing issue. With entire year groups having to isolate and schools being forced to shut, this isn’t a problem that’s going out of the spotlight any time soon. So, why should employers get on board?

The UK is experiencing a childcare crisis – with a recent survey revealing that a lack of childcare played a role in almost half of female layoffs since the pandemic hit. Furthermore, even our keyworkers felt the strain with 67% forced to reduce their hours due to a lack of access to childcare.

It seems unlikely that any working parent will avoid childcare difficulties at some time over the coming months. So, let’s take a look at some of the issues contributing…

 

Issues of being a working parent

Lack of support for working parents

Have you ever felt concerned to admit to childcare issues or felt worried that you’d be met with a negative response? Well, you’re not the only one.

In fact, of those working mothers that did experience a lack of childcare during the pandemic, over half reported that they were met with negativity from their employer. Moreover, it’s likely that this fear will increase as we head into a recession and the peril of redundancy grows within society.

The lack of support goes beyond the employer, however. At current, accessing support is more difficult than ever. Whilst grandparents may be isolating or friends are unable to mix bubbles and pitch in together, many are looking to paid support in the form of nurseries or childminders.

Yet, they’ll be met with a nasty struggle – as many working parents may have found. Only 56% of local authorities have enough childcare for parents working full-time, meaning that childcare spaces are hard to come by, especially at such short notice.

High expenses

Despite the need for childcare to be seen as economic infrastructure, the investment simply doesn’t match and prices for childcare are snowballing out of control, as one of the most highly-regulated sectors push prices up year-on-year.

However, parents are left to brunt the cost of this regulation. In 2020, parents are paying an average of £6,800 for a part-time nursery place. That’s 5% more than last year – well ahead of inflation which sits at 1.50%.

Therefore, with childcare costs becoming an increasing strain on the family unit, it’s concerning to see that families are opting to reduce their groceries in favour of childcare, or feel forced to cut their hours to access tax-free support.

A backstep for equality

The role of a mother has shifted from a stay at home mum to working a triple shift – looking after the home, the family and a job.

As the primary caregiver in the UK, it appears that working mothers are perhaps the worst-affected by the childcare crisis, with a recent study revealing that 72% have been forced to reduce their hours (capping their earning potential) due to a lack of childcare.

But what will be the long-term affects of a mother having to put her career second?

  • Higher levels of female unemployment
  • Less women in senior roles
  • Reduced diversity
  • Increased gender pay gap

With 46% of working mothers stating that childcare was a deciding factor in their redundancy since the pandemic broke, this issue cannot be ignored any longer.

Therefore, in order to avoid taking a step back into the 40s, we must act now to support working parents as a whole.

 

Legal standpoint

As employers

An employee is entitled to take reasonable time off as “dependants leave” but only in specified circumstances. There is no statutory obligation on employers to pay the employee for the time off and what is “reasonable” is not mandated.

An employee also has a separate entitlement to take unpaid parental leave of up to 18 weeks (per child), at any time until the child is 18; but advance notice must be given (whereas time off for dependants is designed to deal with emergency situations).  One type of leave could transition into the other.

For more information about the rights surrounding work and childcare, download our detailed 9-page explainer in our Return to Work Toolkit.

As employees

In addition to dependants leave and unpaid parental leave, anyone who has worked for 26-weeks continuously has the statutory right to submit a formal flexible working request.

The request can include possible changes to work arrangements, such as:

  • Reduction or variation of working hours
  • Reduction or variation of the days worked
  • Working from a different location, eg home.

 

Employer Support – Going The Extra Mile

With all that said, what can employers do above the legal minimum to make the lives of working parents better? Well, here are just a few things to consider:

Normalise Working Parents

Everyone knows THAT news segment where the toddler broke in during an interview on BBC. But, have you seen how they handled the more recent interview with Dr Clare Wenham and her toddler’s unicorn? Normalising parenting can go a long way to reducing anxiety around childcare.

As with all change, ensure your leadership get on board and lead by example – being a parent and being a professional should not be a paradox.

Flexible Working

As the pandemic escalates the shift away from ‘traditional’ ways of working, it’s important to carefully consider your employee’s requests and try to be as accommodating as possible. Failure to do so will likely push them towards a decision of ‘work or home’ – meaning that you could lose out on quality talent.

Download our free flexible working request form and flexible working methods explainer here.

Be Understanding

Simple and effective: showing compassion and understanding to working parents can reduce the fear surrounding this widespread issue.

In such stressful times, employers should be making it as easy as possible for working parents to follow the rules and government guidance. For example, if an employee is concerned that they will lose their job if required to care for children forced to isolate, they may be encouraged to illegally break the isolation period to hide issues from their employer. This will put your workforce as a whole in jeopardy.

To combat the negative experiences of many, we must establish a safer, more understanding environment where employees are able to be transparent about the issues they face – without fear of an adverse reaction.

Policies

Putting formal policies in place to protect both the employee and employer can help establish a more collaborative approach to problem-solving. For example, by having a homeworking policy in place, employers can feel in control of individuals who seek to work from home on a more permanent basis.

Download our free policies here, including:

  • Homeworking policy
  • Health and wellbeing policy
  • Flexible working policy

Gender Pay Report

Whilst it isn’t legally required by all businesses, publishing an annual gender pay report can help employers to become conscious of inequalities within the business.

Consider checking in on the differences between genders in regards to pay, promotional opportunities and recruitment. The first step of righting a wrong is identifying it, after all!

 

Need more help?

During these testing times, the team at Crosse HR are trying to do their bit – supporting small businesses by providing free templates to help time and resources go further.

However, if you require further expert HR support and consultancy, please get in touch. Contact Crosse HR for shrewd, sensibly priced HR solutions you can rely on.

 

EU Settle Status

EU Settle Status

Settle Status: EU Workforce

 

Do you have employees from the EU working within your business? Changes to the law may mean that they have to reapply to secure their residency status with the new EU Settle Status.

To make this transition period easier, we’ll be stepping you through what you need to know as an employer to support the welfare of these employees in such indefinite times.

What is the EU Settle Status?

 

On 31 January 2020, the United Kingdom officially left the European Union. Although no official deal has been agreed upon yet, changes have started to slowly filter through – one of the largest being ‘Settled Status’.

But what is settled status and why does it matter?

Settled status is the term for being a resident in the UK without any immigration restrictions on the length of your stay. There are two types of status in the EU Settlement Scheme:

  • Settled status
  • Pre-settled status

Settled Status:

 

EU citizens who are granted settled status are permitted to stay in the UK as long as they choose; they can also apply for a British citizenship if they are eligible.

 

Pre-settled Status:

 

Pre-settled status – which is usually granted to those who have not lived in the UK for five continuous years – allows inhabitants to stay in the UK for a further five years from the date they are granted pre-settled status. After this period, individuals can reapply for full settled status.

 

Important Notes:

 

The deadline for applying is 30 June 2021.

It is free to apply to the scheme through the government website.

Before beginning the application process for settlement status, applicants should have ready proof of identity and residency. It may also be worth double-checking that applicants have not already received pre-agreed settle status here.

 

What does this mean for employees?

 

Citizens of the EU, EEA or Switzerland can apply to the EU Settlement Scheme to continue living in the UK after 30 June 2021. Without confirmed settlement status, these citizens will not have the assumed right to:

  • Work in the UK
  • Use the NHS for free
  • Enrol in education (or continue studying)
  • Access public funds, such as benefits (if eligible)
  • Enter the UK without a visa

Employees that do not have settled status face the potential risk of having paperwork refused, being unable to work legally in the UK and even deportation – uprooting their family, career and life.

Therefore, it is important to support your EU workforce through their application to ensure there is no disruption to their legal right to work or live in the UK after this deadline.

 

How can employers help?

Importance of application:

 

As employers, there is no legal requirement to inform your workforce of the impending deadline but it’s a good idea to ensure there are no legal hiccups (and it also feels like the right thing to do).

Employers do not require proof that employees have applied but getting status through the scheme will protect their future rights, so it is very important that they apply if you want them to continue working for you.

 

Encouraging application:

 

There are a few practical steps you can take to encourage your employees to apply.

Why not start by sending a letter to all your EU employees? It doesn’t have to take much time with letter templates already drafted up and ready to go. You can also ensure visual cues help prompt their minds by displaying informative posters.

Remember: although you can encourage people to apply, as an employer, you cannot ask them whether they have or about the outcome.

 

Supporting the process itself:

 

The process itself was designed to be as seamless as possible. However, with the added complication of coronavirus, a few spanners have been thrown in the works.

Due to many businesses being shut for a number of months and international travel complications, employees may have struggled to renew expiring passports. Therefore, workers may require flexible hours or additional holiday days to address this before their application.

Further, it may be useful to make your facilities available for support. For example, at this time, many printing shops and internet cafes are shut due to the pandemic. Therefore, pre-granting access for your employees to use your scanner, printer or work phone for their application may aid their progress.

Finally, although it is not standard procedure, if the employee requires any documentation to support their application then provide this in a timely manner; holding this process up will cause additional stress for the employee, distracting them from their work and prolonging indecision.

 

Managing stress:

 

The uncertainty formed in the last few months has had an impact on everyone. However, we must consider those who experience further doubt about their rights within the country compassionately.

Managing stress and keeping a close eye on employees is essential at all times. Look out for key indicators of deteriorating wellbeing, such as:

  • Reduced engagement
  • Missed deadlines
  • Lower morale
  • Increased tiredness

If you notice a significant shift in their wellbeing, it may be time to check in; look out for tell-tale signs of poor employee mental health and be ready to act.

Where possible, refer employees for additional support and be compassionate towards their situation. It may be worth considering ways you can support employees with stress outside of work with flexible working, duvet days or even a shift in the workplace culture.

The charity MIND has some great, free resources to help individuals manage stress – at work and home. Could sharing some of their best resources equip your taskforce with more resilience?

 

What next?

 

Considering your current employees is a great first step, but what about future employees?

Recruitment Process:

 

If you are planning on recruiting before the settlement deadline, it’s important that you don’t sit on your hands.

Speeding up your recruitment process will allow your business to:

  • Beat the deadline;
  • Widen your search for talent;
  • Allow the successful candidate (if from the EU) to apply for settlement status in time.

Discrimination

 

As an employer, you have a duty “not to discriminate against EU citizens in light of the UK’s decision to leave the EU as both a prospective and current employer”.

That means that you cannot make an offer of employment, or continued employment, dependent on an individual having made an application. However, consideration should not stop here; ensure you address workplace discrimination at all levels for a safe working environment for all.

Consider:

  • Checking your processes and procedures for bias
  • Educating employees on how to report discrimination
  • Including EU citizens in your diversity reports
  • Reminding employees of the fine line between ‘banter’ and discriminatory harassment
  • Ensuring you have the processes in place to address hostility appropriately

Right to work checks:

 

It has been confirmed that there will be no change to right to work checks until 1 January 2021. That means that job applicants can continue to prove their right to work using any of the following:

  • their valid passport or national identity card if they’re an EU, EEA or Swiss citizen
  • their valid biometric residence card if they’re a non-EU, EEA or Swiss citizen family member
  • their status under the EU Settlement Scheme using the Home Office’s online right to work checking service.

You will not be required to undertake retrospective checks on existing EU employees. Therefore, changes will only apply to applications in the new year.

For more information, read the official right to work checklist here.

 

More help

 

For official support on how employers should support the EU Settle Status scheme, GOV have created an ‘employer toolkit’ here.

However, if you require expert HR support and consultancy, please get in touch.

 

 

Restructuring Toolkit

Restructuring Toolkit

We decided, as part of the Coming back from Covid series, to give you a quick guide to restructuring.

Whether you are just moving the chairs around the room or making people redundant, our Restructuring Toolkit should provide you a great place to make a start.

We’ve included some templates to help you along – helping you make the most out of your limited time and budget at this difficult time. We sincerely hope that it helps with this difficult time ahead.

Restructuring Toolkit - COVID19 HR Pack

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Criminal Record Checks

Criminal Record Checks

If an applicant or employee has a criminal record, that doesn’t mean they aren’t right for the job.

You may be surprised to learn how many people end up with a criminal conviction by the age of 53. So, how does this affect your hiring decisions?

We explore this and more in our presentation below.

Get to understand criminal record checks in our presentation below, including:

-The Rehabilitation of Offenders Act
-Different Types of DBS
-Spent vs Unspent Convictions
-Disclosure
-Filtering
-Risk Assessments

Please play and pause the slideshow by pressing the button in the bottom left of the video.

If you have any questions, please don’t hesitate to get in touch.

 

Preparing to Return to Work: HR in a Post-Lockdown World

Preparing to Return to Work: HR in a Post-Lockdown World

We are living in very strange times and it is not the first time I have said that…

Who would ever have thought 3 months ago that we would all be cooped up in our own homes for days at a time, let out for an hour, having to queue for our shopping, fretting about toilet roll and tinned tomatoes, baking banana bread and relying on a thing called Zoom we had barely even heard of? Some days, I feel like we’re trapped in some weird apocalyptic Netflix drama – but maybe that’s just because I’ve spent a while watching that too – Tiger King and White Lines anyone?

 

Moving Forward – HR in a Post-Lockdown World

However, lockdown didn’t keep us down for long. We adapted surprisingly quickly, kept going and it’s starting to feel like we’re finally coming out on the other side.

That’s the reason for this blog to be honest…

My raison d’etre is to help small businesses navigate the intricacies and plain madness that comes from employing staff, so I decided to make things easier for you all and put together a pack with all the common questions I am being asked by you about the ‘BIG RETURN’ – along with some guidance, information and resources that should help ease your concerns.

The amazing Helen Fleet will also be contributing from a financial standpoint (we are all in this together).

 

So, you want to open up and start the BIG RETURN, what should you do?

Firstly, you need to think about what your organisation needs to look like; i.e. will it be the same or will you need to pivot and change?

  • Do you need to bring people back into the office or keep them working from home for a while or for the foreseeable future?
  • Have you furloughed staff you need to bring back or are you keeping them on furlough or a bit of both?
  • Will some staff be returning at all?

 

Bringing People Back

What should you be considering before you bring people back? Making these considerations is a great place to start…

1. The big first tranche of returnees will occur in July where the furlough rules are changing to allow employees to be furloughed on a part-time basis. If you need to take employees off furlough, it is advisable to write to them to have it confirmed. In our COVID support kit, we’ve crafted a brief returning from furlough letter template to make this an easy task.

2. You need to do a Risk Assessment for each returning employee.  Unfortunately, the only COVID specific risk assessment I could find is from the Northern Ireland HSE but its great and I highly recommend you use this as a basis for your risk assessments. You can view it within the risk assessment pack of our toolkit here.

3. You need to get your offices ready so that the appropriate level of social distancing can occur. It’s also a good idea to deep clean the office if you can and provide plenty of hand sanitiser, soap and notices from the HSE around hygiene and safe practice. Encouraging good hygiene practice will help to keep to kill the virus.

4. You also need to think about your employees’ journeys to work. Does this put them at risk?

5. It may be worth considering staggering and extending hours, and whether working more flexibly could help your business get back quicker. Check out our Flexible Working Policy within our pack for more information on this.

6. Do you even want your employees in the office at all – or would you prefer they worked from home? If so, we’ve also created a Working from Home Policy to help you formalise and control this agreement.

7. You may want to restructure.

8. You may need to consider redundancies.

These are just some of the considerations you may want to make before rushing back to work.

 

When They Return

Mental health, divorce, feelings of anxiety and displacement, pure joy and relief – these are just some of the things you must prepare to face on your return.

But don’t worry, CrosseHR are here to help and we have you covered. Our comprehensive Return to Work Toolkit has been drawn up by experts and our team. It’s designed to help provide you with everything you need to get started, including:

  • Introduction
  • Information on Ending Furlough
  • Return to Work Letter Template
  • Information for Directors
  • Health and Wellbeing Policy
  • Sickness and Isolation Support
  • Health and Safety Guidance
  • Changing Terms and Conditions
  • Childcare and Returning to Work
  • Maternity Issues
  • Conducting Return to Work Interviews
  • Flexible Working Policy
  • Flexible Working Request Form
  • Flexible Working Methods
  • Homeworking Policy
  • Stress Awareness Template
  • Supporting Employees – Debt
  • Energise – Tackle Business Finances with Helen Fleet
  • Supporting Employees – Divorce

So feel free to download it, it’s on us! And, if you want to chat further, we are always delighted to help.

Olga Crosse, on behalf of the team at Crosse HR.