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Decisions Decisions…. 

Decisions Decisions…. 

Toss a coin and see if you are disappointed”. We used to say this a lot as teenagers when struggling to make decisions or work out if we had made the right one. Today I deal with business owners making decisions all day long big and smallDecision making without proper consideration can result in costly mistakes, whilst slow decision making can cripple a business with indecision and result in lost opportunities. 

Consider where you sit on the decision-making spectrum. 

Quick Decision Making 
 
 
 
Slow Decision Making 
Act now deal with any consequences later 
Quick sense check of financial impact 
Review info promptly, discuss and decide 
Canvass multiple opinions 
Canvass multiple opinions and prepare multiple scenarios 

 

Think about the impact of your approach, is it right for your business and is it right for you. Would you like to move along the spectrum in either direction or consider what you need to do that? 

Financial Impact 

You don’t need a detailed forecast every time you make a decision, but you do need to understand the financial impact. A couple of examples might be – 

Change in sales Mix – Consider if you have the key data established to enable you to understand for example the impact of a change in sales mix. It is often straight forward to pick up the external costs for any changes but think also about the impact on your time, your margins and that of your team of any change.  

 New clients – Growth requires investment so understanding how much you will need to pay out in outsource costs, product costs, system changes or new staff costs will influence your funding requirements. 

 Canvassing Opinion 

Think about who you talk to when making decisions about the business  is it too many or not enough?   

Do you currently make all decisions yourself with no additional input and does that feel right to you or conversely do you ask too many people and acknowledge this then delays your decision making?   

You need to ensure you are asking the right people the right questions…. think carefully about their experiences, one might be right for financials, one for culture, one for process changes. 

 Challenge and Support 

Consider who you have around you when making these decisions too – we can all get stuck in our ways. Think about the last time someone told you your idea wasn’t quite right, how did you react- did you listen, and did you consider your position?   

Surround yourself with good people with complementary skill sets who you trust and who you know will both challenge and support you. 

Consider other business owners with similar challenges perhaps you can create a partnership to challenge and hold each other accountable. You may have other senior team members who you can be more open with and encourage them to bring new ideas and challenge the status quo.  

What next? 

  • Be honest about where you are on the spectrum. 
  • Write three bullet points which state what level of support and challenge you feel you need. 
  • Consider your wider network and internal team and who could fulfil this role to help improve your decision-making. 
What you need to know about redundancy – an employer’s guide

What you need to know about redundancy – an employer’s guide

Right now, we know you’re facing tough decisions in the workplace, and redundancies are commonplace. Yet, a lack of basic understanding still surrounds redundancy in many businesses.  

Our free restructuring toolkit is full of essential information and resources, including a general guide to redundancy, how the redundancy process works and templates for your business plan, consultations, meeting records, notice periods and at-risk employee communications.  

 In this blog, we’ll give you an insight into what you’ll find in our restructuring toolkit and answer your top 10 most pressing redundancy questions. Read on to gain a clear, practical grasp of redundancy to move forward confidently.  

#1 – I have four people and three jobs. Can I make the last one redundant? 

 No, the last in, first out criteria was abolished years ago, as it paved the way for claims of indirect age and gender discrimination and unfair dismissal. Instead, use selection criteria or a competitive interview process to determine who you will make redundant. 

#2 – Can I make redundant employees work their notice period? 

 Yes, as per the terms of their contract. Although employees can try to negotiate a shorter notice period with you, that’s your decision. If your employees refuse to work out their notice, they’ll be in breach of their contract, and you won’t have to pay them for this period.  

#3 – Do I have to pay redundancy? 

 Yes. If your employees have more than two years’ service, they’re entitled to a statutory redundancy payment paid out by the employer.  

#4 – Do I have to pay a redundancy notice? 

 Yes. Regardless of the length of service, all employees are entitled to a paid notice period during a redundancy.  

#5 – Can I make a pregnant employee redundant? 

 Yes, although not because she is pregnant. If you wish to make a pregnant employee redundant, you must follow the proper process and ensure her job is genuinely redundant. If you fail to do this, your employee can claim unfair dismissal on the grounds of her gender and circumstances. 

#6 – Can I reinstate the job after making someone redundant? 

 No. The point of redundancy is that the job no longer exists, so you don’t require that employee’s services to fulfil it. If you immediately advertise for the same position after making someone redundant, it isn’t a genuine redundancy, and you could face legal action.  

#7 – If business picks up following a redundancy process, can I reinstate the job? 

 You should wait between six to 12 months after a redundancy process before introducing and advertising for a similar role, or it won’t be a genuine redundancy. If trade has improved significantly after this period, you can review your requirements and proceed accordingly.  

#8 – An employee I wanted to retain has volunteered for redundancy. What should I do? 

 Redundancy is an employer’s choice, not the employee’s. So, ultimately, it’s your decision to make. However, if your employee is volunteering for redundancy, they are likely to be unhappy in their job and may look elsewhere. Therefore, talk to the employee to address any concerns or issues they have to see if you can help them feel happier in their role. 

#9 – Can I take redundant employees back if business picks up?  

Yes, you can and should. 

#10 – How do I stop redundant employees suing me?  

You can’t unless you ask them to sign a Settlement Agreement. All employees have a right to take their claim to an employment tribunal if they feel you’ve treated them unlawfully. However, if you’re confident you’ve followed procedure and treated employees fairly, this shouldn’t pose an issue to your business. 

How do I find bespoke redundancy support?  

In this blog, we’ve covered the 10 most common questions you’ve asked us about redundancy.  

However, if we haven’t answered your question here and you need further advice, we can offer you bespoke support designed around your needs and circumstances.   

There’s no need to deal with your HR headache alone – let us ease the pain by providing practical support.   

 Call us on 0330 555 1139 or email hello@crossehr.co.uk, and let’s see how we can help you navigate redundancies with confidence.